World War II in the News is a daily edited review of WWII articles - including German WW2 militaria - providing thought-provoking collection of hand-picked WW2 information.

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War Brides

World War II War Brides - Collectibles and commemoratives.
Latest hand-picked WWII news.

Canadian province recognizes war brides officially
At the end of World War II, Newfoundland and Labrador saw an influx of people as it had never seen before or since. 1,000 women crossed the Atlantic to start new lives with soldiers from this province. War brides have played a significant part in our history but have never been formally recognized - until now, when Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dave Denine signs a proclamation honouring war brides and the contribution they`ve made to the province`s history. War bride May Ash says the little wooden houses looked temporary to her as she was used to homes of stone or brick, but the people were warm and welcoming.
(thetelegram.com)

War brides captured 1,800 of New Brunswickers` hearts   (Article no longer available from the original source)
For the 43,454 war brides who came to Canada during and after the World War II it was not always easy to start a new life far from family and friends. This was particularly true for the 1,800 who came to New Brunswick. At the time, the province had less than half a million people. It was mostly rural, and outside of the few main cities and towns, the women often had to live in much more primitive conditions than in their home countries. In certain cases, the farms their husbands had described to them in praising terms overseas turned out to be a hardscrabble. It`s amazing that so many of the marriages survived.
(thechronicleherald.ca)

The Japanese War Brides exhibit at Australian National Maritime Museum
An exhibit at the Australian National Maritime Museum shows how something else overcame wartime hostilities in occupied Japan after World War II. 12,000 Australian troops were based in Japan at that time. At first marriage between Australian soldiers and Japanese women was not allowed, but many men fell in love and lobbied for change. In 1952 Immigration Minister Harold Holt lifted the ban and the Japanese women who sailed to Australia were the first major group of non-Europeans permitted under Australia`s White Australia Policy. In spite of living with enduring prejudice, over 600 Japanese women moved to Australia as war brides.
(thewest.com.au)

Band of Sisters - 70,000 British war brides arrived 1945-1950 in America
Donato Guaricci was there to meet his bride when the Saturnia docked at New York Harbor in 1946. They had met at a pub on Kings Road in Chelsea. He was an American GI; she was 16, an English girl from Battersea. They married in London at the end of World War II. And when they reunited in New York, Eileen Guaricci stepped onto the streets of Manhattan, and asked him about the sights of some sort of parade. Was it for the British women who had finished the 10-day trip across the Atlantic to their American soldier husbands? No, he told her, it was the St. Patrick’s Day Parade... 60 years later a handful of surviving British war brides gather monthly in Queens.
(nytimes.com)

Canadian War brides` children may not be citizens
Tens of thousands who assumed they were Canadians have had their citizenship thrown into question by a court ruling on the status of WWII brides and their children. The Federal Court of Appeal overturned the decision that ordered Ottawa to grant citizenship to the British son of a Canadian war veteran. Judgment says brides and kids born overseas (granted citizenship by a special wartime order in 1945) lost that status if they left Canada after 1947 and did not sign a form to have their citizenship reinstated. "The wartime order, giving the families of returning war veterans the same citizenship rights as the soldiers themselves is meaningless," said Rory Morahan.
(montrealgazette)

World War II War brides recall their bittersweet journeys
"Believe me, it was scary. My mother was brokenhearted because she thought she would never see me again. My new mother-in-law thought I was trying to take advantage of her son," Delores Kirby said, her blue eyes scanning the horizon as she sat among the other passengers, all of them war brides. It was a similar experience for the thousands of other European women who married American servicemen during or after World War II. This weekend more than a hundred of them have gathered in Chicago to share their memories. Somewhat isolated on the top deck were the German war brides. Some of the other women confessed that their disdain for Germans still lingers.
(chicagotribune)

First british `traitor` bride and her German PoW mark diamond wedding
Some young lovers have to overcome parental disapproval. June Tull and Heinz Fellbrich had a different hurdle: World War II. 60 years on, the first British girl to marry a German POW admits it has left its battle scars. Fellbrich recalled the first moment she spotted the man who would become her husband over the fence of a PoW camp. "I thought he was absolutely gorgeous... The PoWs were allowed out until dusk after work each day and he agreed to meet me. And that was it." The couple married on August 14, 1947. The Govt had just made it legal for German PoWs to marry British women and the wedding, the first of its kind, made headlines around the world.
(dailymail.co.uk)

World War II Aussie war brides see citizenship delays
Hundreds of Australian war brides in the US hoping to apply on Sunday to reclaim their Australian citizenship were left disappointed - but only for a day. The forms appeared on the website around midday on Sunday (AEST) and because of the time difference, it was the evening in the US so many of the war brides were asleep or unaware. 15,000 war brides left Australia after WWII - losing their Australian citizenship. The Australian Citizenship Act 2007, allows the war brides and their children to apply to regain their Australian citizenship.
(theage)

Japanese war brides reflect on their journey - After the 1945 surrender
For all the horrific legacies of World War II there is at the personal level another side to the coin. After the surrender of Japan in 1945, thousands of Australians were deployed to help rebuild the nation. Hundreds built a new life after falling in love with Japanese women, but they faced many adversities along the way. Now these women have come together to remember their journeys. At its peak there were 12,000 Australians in Japan, the war may have ended but hostility lingered. The Australian military had a strict anti fraternisation policy for its soldiers. What`s more, many Japanese were wary of the former enemy. But there were so many opportunities to meet...
(abc)